Courses / Current Courses

 



2019 Courses

MA students are required to complete 30 semester hours (typically 10 course credits). All students will take 8 courses, normally enrolling in two courses per summer. After earning these credits, students seeking to earn the MA may earn their final course credits either by writing a thesis or by enrolling in two more courses. Students seeking the MFA after completing 8 courses (4 workshops and 4 literature classes), will submit a final thesis. No course with a grade lower than B- may be applied toward the degree. The “core” for all MA students will consist of courses in English literature, of which one must be Shakespeare, courses in American literature, of which one must cover literature written before 1900, and at least one class in non-English literature in translation. Beyond that, all students are encouraged to strike a balance between courses covering material from before and after 1800. As many as two Creative Writing Workshops may be counted toward the MA degree.

English 509, Workshop in Poetry Writing

Discussions center on students' poems. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Tiana Clark.

English 510, Workshop in Fiction Writing

Discussions center on students' fiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.)  Chris Bachelder or Lee Conell.

English 512, Workshop in Nonfiction Writing

Discussions center on students' nonfiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Meera Subramanian.

English 514, Workshop in Playwriting

Discussions center on students' plays or screenplays. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Elyzabeth Wilder.

English 596, American Environmental Literature and Ecocriticism

This course explores the "green theme" and the emerging cross-disciplinary character of "ecocriticism" as reflected in writings selected from the full span of American cultural history. Readings include both traditional literary texts and seminal nonfiction by figures such as William Bartram, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Rachel Carson, Annie Dillard, Barry Lopez, and Wendell Berry. (Credit, full course.) John Gatta.

English 593, Faulkner

Study of the major novels of perhaps the most important American writer of the 20th century: The Sound and the FuryAs I Lay DyingLight in AugustAbsalom, Absalom!, and (time permitting) Go Down, Moses. Faulkner was a modernist master, with intuitions of the postmodern. Attention will be given to the complicated burdens of race, sexuality, consciousness, Southern identity, modernism, language, as well as the techniques of and insistence on 'telling' itself. (Credit, full course.) Allen Reddick.

English 570, British Romanticism

Study of major literary works and theories of the Romantic period in Britain, including poetry by Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, and the Shelleys. (Credit, full course.) Kathryn Freeman.

English 557, Shakespeare

Advanced study of major plays of William Shakespeare and of major critical traditions regarding Shakespeare’s work. (Credit, full course.) Ross Macdonald.

English 553, The Romance of Arthur

A study of the literature surrounding the figure of King Arthur and the knights of the Round Table, from its origins in the early Middle Ages to the present. As we discover how each generation remakes the legend in its own image, this becomes a course in cultural transmission, with readings (in translation) from texts in Latin, Welsh, French, and German, as well as English. Among the works studied will be The Knight of the Cart by Chrétien de Troyes, Wolfram von Eschenbach’s Parzival, the Middle English verse romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Malory's Morte d'Arthur, Tennyson's Idylls of the King, Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, and Bernard Malamud's baseball novel, The Natural. We will also consider offshoots of Arthurian legend in the visual arts, opera, and such films as Excalibur, The Fisher King, and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. The final assignment for the course may be either a term paper or a creative project. (Credit, full course; covers Literature in Translation requirement.) Mark Rasmussen.