Courses / Current Courses

 



2016 Courses

MA students are required to complete 30 semester hours (typically 10 course credits). All students will take 8 courses, normally enrolling in two courses per summer. After earning these credits, students seeking to earn the MA may earn their final course credits either by writing a thesis or by enrolling in two more courses. Students seeking the MFA after completing 8 courses (4 workshops and 4 literature classes), will submit a final thesis. No course with a grade lower than B- may be applied toward the degree. The “core” for all MA students will consist of courses in English literature, of which one must be Shakespeare, courses in American literature, of which one must cover literature written before 1900, and at least one class in non-English literature in translation. Beyond that, all students are encouraged to strike a balance between courses covering material from before and after 1800. As many as two Creative Writing Workshops may be counted toward the MA degree.

English 503, Literary Criticism

This course considers some of the great questions about the nature and value of literature addressed by literary theorists from Plato to the present, engaging such critical approaches as the New Criticism, reader response theory, Marxist criticism, feminist criticism, psychoanalytic criticism, structuralism, deconstruction, new historicism, and cultural studies. The course has two aims: first, to help us become more aware of what we do, and why we do it, when we study literature; and, second, to help us write better literary criticism ourselves, as we apply a range of methods to the works we study. (Credit, full course.) Mark Rasmussen.

English 504, Film Studies

While closely examining several films, the course will introduce students to the major components of film style, essential techniques of film analysis and the critical vocabulary required for it, and some film theory. Focus will be on American and particularly southern films, and the art of the screenplay. (Credit, full course.) Michael Dunaway.

English 505, Classics of Latin American Literature

Study of the literature of Spanish America, with special emphasis on major prose writers of the 20th century, including Borges, Vargas Llosa, and Garcia-Marquez. Covers literature in translation requirement. (Credit, full course; covers Literature in Translation requirement.) Ron Briggs.

English 530, Tennessee Williams

A close study of Tennessee Williams's major dramatic works, as well as his poetry and fiction and the films based on the major plays. The course will also look at the biographical genesis of Williams's plays and will focus on the development of and interplay between his concepts of gender, sexuality, and religion.  An examination of the critical responses to the plays and films will be used to gauge shifts in the American social and cultural landscape. (Credit, full course.) Virginia Craighill.

English 572, The Gothic in Literature

This class surveys the history and development of gothic fiction and poetry (such as Young’s Night Thoughts, and Collin’s "Ode to Fear") with particular, but not exclusive, emphasis on British literature. Tropes and topics to be discussed include the sublime, the uncanny, terror, gothic space, and sexuality and gender.  Readings may include fiction by Horace Walpole, Ann Ward Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis, Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker, Henry James, Edgar Allen Poe, and Oscar Wilde. (Credit, full course.) Kelly Malone.

English 598, Forms of Fiction

How does fiction "work"?  This course attempts to answer that question with close study of stories, novellas, and novels with a special emphasis on issues of form and technique.  (Credit, full course.) Chris Bachelder.

English 509, Workshop in Poetry Writing

Discussions center on students' poems. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Charles Martin.

English 510, Workshop in Fiction Writing

Discussions center on students' fiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.)  Adrianne Harun or Chris Bachelder.

English 512, Workshop in Nonfiction Writing

Discussions center on students' nonfiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Neil Shea.