Courses / Current Courses

 



2017 Courses

MA students are required to complete 30 semester hours (typically 10 course credits). All students will take 8 courses, normally enrolling in two courses per summer. After earning these credits, students seeking to earn the MA may earn their final course credits either by writing a thesis or by enrolling in two more courses. Students seeking the MFA after completing 8 courses (4 workshops and 4 literature classes), will submit a final thesis. No course with a grade lower than B- may be applied toward the degree. The “core” for all MA students will consist of courses in English literature, of which one must be Shakespeare, courses in American literature, of which one must cover literature written before 1900, and at least one class in non-English literature in translation. Beyond that, all students are encouraged to strike a balance between courses covering material from before and after 1800. As many as two Creative Writing Workshops may be counted toward the MA degree.

English 509, Workshop in Poetry Writing

Discussions center on students' poems. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Nickole Brown.

English 510, Workshop in Fiction Writing

Discussions center on students' fiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.)  Michael Griffith or Jamie Quatro.

English 512, Workshop in Nonfiction Writing

Discussions center on students' nonfiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Meera Subramanian.

English 514, Workshop in Playwriting

Discussions center on students' plays or screenplays. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (Credit, full course, repeatable. Counts as an elective for MA students [who may offer as many as two writing workshops toward the degree] and as a Workshop for MFA students.) Arlene Hutton.

English 595, African American Literature

Advanced study of the major traditions of African American writing from the nineteenth century to the present, including Frederick Douglass, Linda Brent, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, Ernest Gaines, Toni Morrison, and Rita Dove.  (Credit, full course.) John Ernest.

English 594, Literature of the American South

Advanced study of the literary tradition of the U.S. South, with emphasis on such major writers as Mark Twain, Charles Chesnutt, William Faulkner, Eudora Welty, Robert Penn Warren and others of the Agrarian circle, Zora Neal Hurston, and Flannery O'Connor. Attention also to antebellum and contemporary southern writing, and to writers associated with Sewanee. (Credit, full course.) John Grammer.

English 581, Modern British Poetry

Examination of the modern period in British poetry, including close study of Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Lawrence, Auden and others. (Credit, full course.) Jenn Lewin.

English 572, Special Topics in British Literature: Reading Dickens

John Irving once said that reading Dickens made him want to write novels. Dostoevsky, Kafka, and Freud all claimed to have been influenced by Dickens, and contemporary writers continue to fight over the right to be deemed “Dickensian.” Dickens was deft at so much: characterization, voice, mimicry, the theatrical, the fantastical, the fairy tale, the grotesque, both comedy and horror. This course focuses on the craft of a working writer who was enormously successful in his own lifetime and who remains deeply affecting to us today. (Credit, repeatable, full course.) Barbara Black.

English 566, Dr. Johnson and the Poets

Close study of several major English poets (Shakespeare, Donne, Cowley, Milton, Dryden, Pope, Swift, Gray), through the lens provided by the great critic Samuel Johnson, who wrote about them all. The course also looks ahead to such modern writers as Robert Lowell and Samuel Beckett, who read Johnson as a model and inspiration. (Credit, full course.) Allen Reddick.

English 557, Shakespeare

Advanced study of major plays and lyric poems of William Shakespeare, and of major critical traditions regarding Shakespeare’s work. The course places special emphasis on issues of performance. (Credit, full course.) Ann Jennalie Cook.