Readings, Lectures and Events / Upcoming School of Letters Readings and Lectures

Every summer the School of Letters invites writers, poets, publishers and scholars to speak each week that school is in session. All readings and lectures take place at Gailor Auditorium unless otherwise noted, and a reception usually follows upstairs in the atrium. The public is welcome. Events held outside of Sewanee are also listed here.

Click here for a list of past events.


 



June 28, 2016 at 7:30 pm

Crimson Peak Screening

Film screening of Crimson Peak, in conjunction with the Gothic in Literature course taught by Kelly Malone.

2015, dir. Guillermo del Toro, 1h 59min Rated R

In the aftermath of a family tragedy, an aspiring author is torn between love for her childhood friend and the temptation of a mysterious outsider. Trying to escape the ghosts of her past, she is swept away to a house that breathes, bleeds - and remembers.

7:30 pm at the Sewanee Union Theater. Free and open to the public.

 

 

 

 

June 29, 2016 at 4:30 pm

What Was the New Journalism? A Dialogue with John Grammer and Neil Shea

Marshall Frady called it an “odd unchurched coupling between the novel and journalism.” Tom Wolfe gave it the name that stuck, “the New Journalism,” a designation John Sullivan glosses like this: “the long, weird, quasi-essayistic, documentary-infused magazine piece, a form older than the novel, despite a heritable instinct in critics to continually be calling it New.” New or old, the form experienced a remarkable flowering in the 1960’s and early ‘70’s, when writers like Frady and Wolfe—and Mailer and Talese and King and Morris--created a remarkable moment in American letters, one that continues to inspire writers like Sullivan. John Grammer, Director of the School of Letters, and Neil Shea, School of Letters faculty and National Geographic writer, discuss the moment and its influence on nonfiction writing today.

Wednesday, June 29 at 4:30 pm, Gailor Auditorium. Reception following, Gailor Atrium.

 

 

July 5, 2016 at 7:30 pm

Take Shelter Screening

Film screening of Take Shelter, in conjunction with the Film Studies course taught by Michael Dunaway.

2011, dir. Jeff Nichols , 2 h,  Rated R

Plagued by a series of apocalyptic visions, a young husband and father questions whether to shelter his family from a coming storm, or from himself.

7:30 pm at the Sewanee Union Theater. Free and open to the public.

 

 

 

July 6, 2016 at 4:30 pm

Jennine Capo Crucet

Jennine Capó Crucet is the author of two books, most recently the novel Make Your Home Among Strangers (St. Martin's Press). Her story collection, How to Leave Hialeah, won the Iowa Short Fiction Award, the John Gardner Book Prize, and was named a Best Book of the Year by The Miami Herald, the Miami New Times, and the Latinidad List. Her writing has appeared in Guernica, Ploughshares, Epoch, The Rumpus, Prairie Schooner, and other magazines.  She's the fiction editor of PEN Center USA’s Handbook for Writers, a comprehensive writing manual used in high schools nationally as part of PEN’s Writers in the Schools programs. A former sketch comedienne and National Public Radio scriptwriter, she’s worked extensively as a writing coach and college advisor for high school students and also led the Young Artists’ Workshop (exclusively for high school writers) at the Port Townsend Writers' Conference for three years. A winner of an O. Henry Prize and a Bread Loaf Fellow, she received her B.A. from Cornell University and her M.F.A. from the University of Minnesota, where she was also an instructor. She grew up in Miami but now lives in Lincoln, Nebraska, where she’s an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at the University of Nebraska. To learn more about Crucet, visit her web site at http://jennine-crucet.squarespace.com.

Wednesday, July 6, at 4:30 pm, Gailor Auditorium. Reception and book signing following, Gailor Atrium.

 

 

 

July 13, 2016 at 4:30 pm

MFA Candidate Reading

MFA Candidate Reading, Wednesday, July 13, at 4:30 PM, Gailor Auditorium. Student Farewell Dinner follows.