2022 semester courses

LITERATURE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH | ENGL 594 (Spring Online Course)

Folklorist William Ferris has said that oral history is the root of all Southern art. If we accept that art is formed from this human impulse to tell, then what stories is the region telling itself? Who gets to narrate? How have those stories changed over time, from Eudora Welty to Jesmyn Ward, Gone with the Wind to The Wind Done Gone? What shorthand signs have come to stand in for the South, and how are those interpreted, misinterpreted, and subverted? Over the semester we’ll examine four themes—Landscape, Race, Kin, and Language—as we study Southern literature in a broader creative context that will include dashes of folk art, film, and hip-hop. (SIMPSON SMITH) (Credit, full course)

SUMMER COURSES

Workshop in Poetry Writing | ENGL 509

Discussions center on students' poems. Selected readings are assigned to focus on the technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (CLARK) (Credit, full course, can be repeated)

The Craft of Poetry | ENGL 507

Through close analysis of the poems of various modern and contemporary masters, we will consider the implications of verse as an imitation of voice, and consider how the poet’s voice is shaped by choices made in terms of imagery, themes, form and technique.

Forms & Theories

A study of the forms, techniques, and theories of poetry, this course in prosody is for the serious student of poetry that wants to understand the ticking of the clock, so to speak, by taking apart its intricate workings of tiny cogs and springs and notched wheels. We’ll investigate the historical developments of prosody, but the vast majority of our time will be dedicated to applying what you've learned to your own creative practice. You'll try your hand at writing your own sonnets and sestinas and villanelles and haiku, but you'll also examine the basic building blocks of poetry—rhyme, rhythm, sonic echo, syntax, line breaks, and meter—to get a clear sense of how each can underscore and accentuate a poem’s emotional tenor and tension. We’ll discover what music different forms make, how one might reinvent traditional forms to make them your own, and ultimately, how a mastery of craft can strengthen both your reading and writing skills.

(BROWN) (Credit, full course, can be repeated)

Workshop in Fiction Writing | ENGL 510

Discussions center on students' fiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (BACHELDER) (Credit, full course)

Forms of Fiction | ENGL 598

How does fiction "work"? This course attempts to answer that question with close study of stories, novellas, and novels with a special emphasis on issues of form and technique.

The Comic in Fiction

Humor is a key element of nearly every aspect of craft in fiction, from voice to character, from setting to detail, from prose style to establishing narrative audience. This craft-focused course will analyze the broadly comic and the barely comic in classic and contemporary fiction. We'll also spend some time considering humor as a mode of rhetoric. We will read both widely and closely to learn how writers such as Kazuo Ishiguro, Gunnhild Øyehaug, Paul Beatty, and Joy Williams. We'll engage in generative exercises to stretch our writing practices. And it's very likely that by the end of the course we'll be witness to at least one spit-take.

(CHAPMAN) (Credit, full course, can be repeated)

Workshop in Nonfiction Writing | ENGL 512

Discussions center on students' nonfiction. Selected readings are assigned to focus on technical problems of craftsmanship and style. (QUATRO) (Credit, full course)

Forms of Nonfiction | ENGL 518

Through the close study of nonfiction writing including essays, researched work, and memoir, this course examines the way nonfiction writing works with a special emphasis on form and technique.

Taking Place: Literature & the Land

Consider the phrase “taking place.” What does it mean for a writer to take a place with its weather, scents, secrets, history, and amorphous gestalt--and pin it down on the page? Landscapes can feel eternal, or infinitely dynamic, or like they're supposed be one but are, in fact, the other. Climate change is rewriting the scripts of places around the world and in our backyards. This course will put our noses to the ground and our eyes to the sky as we explore what it means for writing to make a place a meaningful part of a narrative. We'll explore this idea together by reading and analyzing a wide variety of nonfiction forms to see how essayists, journalists, graphic narrators, and memoirists create places that serve as characters as strong as the humans who inhabit them. Through close reading of both classic and contemporary texts, from Annie Dillard to Amitav Ghosh, students will learn narrative techniques that will help them navigate structure, elucidate style, find their form and voice, and go deeper with the ideas they are exploring through the written word. All the while finding a rootedness in the place where stories are...taking place.

(SUBRAMANIAN) (Credit, full course, can be repeated)

Shakespeare ENGL 557

Advanced study of major plays of William Shakespeare and of major critical traditions regarding Shakespeare’s work.

The Nature of Shakespeare’s Tragedies will consist of the study, close reading, and critical discussion of six of Shakespeare’s plays: Romeo and Juliet, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, Antony and Cleopatra (one play to be considered during each of the School of Letter’s six-week summer session). Study of the plays will be augmented by the reading of critical literature. A final paper will be submitted after the summer session; short written responses may be assigned during the semester.

(REDDICK) (Credit, full course, after 2021 can be repeated).

 

 

2022 book list 

ENGLISH 507 –

THE CRAFT OF POETRY -  FORMS & THEORIES - NICKOLE BROWN

A Poet’s Craft: A Comprehensive Guide to Making & Sharing Your Poetry, by Annie Finch, ISBN-13:  ‎978-0472033645

 

ENGLISH 509 –

POETRY WORKSHOP - TIANA CLARK

Selected essays from The Triggering Town: Lectures and Essays on Poetry and Writing 

Selected essays from  A Broken Thing: Poets on the Line 

The Naomi Letters by Rachel Mennies

Blood Dazzler by Patricia Smith

Stag’s Leap by Sharon Olds

Obit by Victoria Chang

Poetry Packets will be provided 

 

ENGLISH 598 –

FORMS OF FICTION -  THE COMIC IN FICTION - RYAN CHAPMAN

SENSELESSNESS, Horacio Castellanos Moya
THE SELLOUT, Paul Beatty

NO ONE BELONGS HERE MORE THAN YOU, Miranda July
THE GHOST WRITER, Philip Roth

 

ENGLISH 510A –

FICTION WORKSHOP - CHRIS BACHELDER

Karen Bender, REFUND

Sarah Shun-lien Bynum, LIKES

 

ENGLISH 518 –

FORMS OF NONFICTION -  TAKING PLACE: LITERATURE & LAND –

MEERA SUBRAMANIAN

Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek (Harper Perennial Modern Classics)

Margaret Renkl, Late Migrations: A Natural History of Love and Loss

J. Drew Lanham, The Home Place: Memoirs of a Colored Man’s Love Affair with Nature

David George Haskell, The Forest Unseen: A Year’s Watch in Nature

 

ENGLISH 512 –

NONFICTION WORKSHOP - JAMIE QUATRO

Phillip Lopate, To Show and To Tell: The Craft of Literary Nonfiction

Christian Wiman, My Bright Abyss: Meditation of a Modern Believer

 

The class will also read essays - Montaigne & Woolf, Sontag & Didion, Eula Bis, Leslie Jamison, etc. - to be distributed individually throughout the term.

 

ENGLISH 557 –

SHAKESPEARE - ALLEN REDDICK

Students are required to have access to scholarly editions of the plays, appropriate for graduate
study. The texts of Hamlet and King Lear are particularly problematic. I will be using, for Hamlet, the Arden edition; for King Lear, the New Cambridge. In both cases, I will have reference to the Riverside Shakespeare.


Your own choices should be taken from this list:


Editions of individual plays:
New Cambridge Shakespeare
Arden Shakespeare.


Anthologies of plays:
Riverside Shakespeare
Norton Shakespeare
Oxford Shakespeare